Tuesday, October 28, 2014

Congregational Listening Sessions

In my part-time job as Missions Mobilization Team Leader of Churchnet, I've been privileged of late to participate in some congregational leadership listening sessions.  Our organization is embarking upon the elaboration of a new 5-year strategic plan.  In keeping with the overarching goal of our first priority being to serve churches, we're conducting these listening sessions to discover what the major challenges are facing churches across the state of Missouri.  In light of what we're hearing, we'll attempt to strategically respond in terms of how we structure, organize, and fund our ministry to these churches.

It's been a good time of getting to hear how folks were drawn to their congregations, what makes their heart sing in terms of their current ministries, how they're coping with change, and the obstacles in the way of achieving their ministry goals, among several other questions that we're asking.  To date, I've had the opportunity to facilitate sessions at Wyatt Park Baptist in St. Joseph, Chandler Baptist in Liberty, and FBC Independence and then to participate as a leader responding to the questions last night at our own church, FBC, Lee's Summit.

The strategy planning team will be meeting at Windermere on Nov. 7-8 to look at the responses to these sessions as well as responses to an on-line survey as we work on a first draft of a new strategic plan.  These are exciting days for Churchnet as we continue to make our first priority serving churches.

Monday, October 20, 2014

Reflections on Cuba

I had the opportunity this past week to spend 8 days in Cuba with 11 fellow travelers.  Our primary purpose in going was to attend the 40th anniversary gathering of COEBAC (the English translation of the Spanish acrostic is the Coordination of Baptist Student Workers of Cuba).  All 4 Baptist entities on the island were invited to attend (Western Baptist Convention, Eastern Baptist Convention, Free Will Baptists, and the Fraternity of Baptists).  Representatives from the Eastern Convention and the Fraternity were present.  It seems that Baptist denominational politics has been extended even to Cuba as purportedly some of the Western Convention folks were coming (predominantly affiliated with Southern Baptists) until they learned who some of the program participants were from the Eastern Convention and the Fraternity, at which time they withdrew.

The theme of the meeting was exploring what it means to be a Baptist, guided by historical Baptist distinctives such as separation of church and state, religious liberty, liberty of conscience, and local church autonomy in the contemporary world.  I was asked to lead a breakout session on liberty of conscience and asked the pastor of the host church if it was okay in a Communist/socialist country to speak freely of those themes.  He assured me that it was and so I did.  There was a representative of the Central Committee of the Communist Party, head of the National Office of Attention to Religious Affairs, who also spoke to the gathering.  She recognized the importance of living by Christian values for the well-being of the country.

One of the key figures from the 1959 revolution mentioned in the meeting and by this official was Frank Pais, the son of a Baptist pastor.  Whereas Fidel Castro and Che Guevara led the revolution in the mountains, Frank Pais was the key figure in the urban centers--especially Santiago.  He was killed by police after being surrounded in what was supposedly a safe house, thereafter achieving the status of a revolutionary martyr. His favorite hymn was "Brighten the Corner where You Are" which we sang together.

We also later visited the Western Baptist Convention's seminary in Havana, meeting with its interim president and its rector, who explained the various degree programs and emphases of their theological training.

One of the unexpected sightings on the trip was a funnel cloud as we were returning to Havana from the COEBAC gathering in the city of Ciego de Avila.  We watched it out the left side of the bus for some 30 minutes, catching glimpses of it through the almost constant line of trees that bordered the side of the highway.

Classic car enthusiasts would have a heyday in Cuba.  There are literally hundreds if not thousands of 1950s model U.S. cars--Chevys, Fords, Pontiacs, Buicks, Dodges, Chryslers, Cadillacs, etc.  

I got to ride in the blue Caddy with 3 friends for an hour or so tour of the city on the way to dinner one evening.  It was quite the treat.

One of the lasting impressions I took away from the trip was the strong commitment of Cuban Baptists to reach their island nation for Christ with the gospel, while at the same time striving to improve the overall living conditions of their people.  We heard a lot of concern for justice and economic issues as well as a healthy interest in caring for the world that God has given us as good stewards of it.  These same Baptists also expressed a pronounced pride in their country and displayed patriotic fervor.  The worship services we attended contained joyful singing and solid preaching.  All in all, it was a memorable trip.